Posts Tagged ‘Obama’

Super PAC Money: Did it make a difference?

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The media and political talking heads spent a lot of time thinking about and discussing the potential effects the Citizens United decision would make on this year’s elections. Now that the votes are in and the victors announced, we can finally determine how big of an impact the one billion dollars in independent money had on Election Day results.

It didn’t seem to make much of one.

More than two-thirds of the one billion dollars spent throughout the election cycle went toward losing candidates. Groups who supported Republican Senate candidates pumped $100 million into seven races, and the Republican candidate lost in each of them. In House races, 24 Democrats and eight Republicans won their elections despite being outspent by their opponents.

Even though “dark money” didn’t play as large a role in winning elections as some originally thought, the Citizens United decision did make the 2012 election cycle different from any past year. Over one million television commercials – the majority of which were overtly negative – aired throughout the year, and candidates were forced to spend an unprecedented amount of time fundraising just to keep up with their opponents.

President Obama, who once again relied on his “small-donor army” and raised more than a billion dollars in campaign contributions, held twice as many fundraisers as rallies during his campaign, and Romney’s camp was still in fundraising mode in late October, mere weeks away from Election Day.

So even if it seems as though money didn’t make a difference, it’s never mattered more in the minds of candidates and campaign teams.

What’s next?

Leader of Super PACs and other nonprofits have proven they have no problem finding wealthy donors and convincing them to write large checks to support certain candidates or issues. But now, since it’s clear that their spending wasn’t enough to win an election, they’ll need to rethink their strategies.

In 2008, President Obama outdid his opponent in the world of social media. His presence on sites such as Twitter and Facebook was more prominent that that of John McCain, and the Internet is one of the primary reasons he was able to surpass $1 billion in campaign contributions.

This year, his campaign found a way to innovate campaign finance once again. Weeks before the election, pro-Obama messaging – complete with a “Paid for by the Obama Victory Fund” disclaimer – encouraged visitors of video websites such as Hulu and YouTube to vote on Election Day.

It’ll be interesting to see if third-party groups follow President Obama onto YouTube and Hulu, hoping that they can make a bigger impact in the next Election cycle.

New Apps Explain Super PAC Spending

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As they do every four years, presidential candidates are beginning to appear much more frequently during our favorite TV shows’ commercial breaks.

With the November election mere months away, the likes of adorable Subaru commercials and creative Google spots have been overrun by political attack ads funded by Super PAC groups such as American Crossroads or Priorities USA.  While it’s no secret that prime-time advertising space on network channels is extraordinarily expensive, average Americans do not know very much about the groups who sign the checks to put these attack ads on the air.

In an effort to make Super PAC information more transparent and inform the general public, Sunlight Foundation – an educational organization committed to increasing transparency in US government – and Glassy Media – a new business founded by two grad students from Harvard and MIT – recently released mobile applications called Ad Hawk and Super PAC Apps, respectively.  Using the same audio recognition technology as apps such as Shazam, these apps can listen to a political advertisement and – within seconds – give users a comprehensive bio of the group that paid for it.  Both Ad Hawk and Super PAC App include a detailed summary of the group’s mission statement and business plan, how much money the group has raised and spent to date, and how much cash on hand the group has in the bank.  They also show how much money the PAC is spending on negative ads versus positive ads and which political candidate the group supports or opposes.

Political attack ads – from both sides of the aisle – have often had a tendency to border on the line of truth.  Few would go so far as to say the ads are littered with flat-out lies, but many would agree it’d be fair to say they typically look at large issues through a very tiny window.  And in today’s Digital Age, with information spreading so rapidly on so many different channels, it’s very difficult for average voters to find the truth.  Super PAC Apps has a solution to that problem.  After listening to an ad, the application gives viewers a list of information, statistics, or claims the advertisement made with links to reputable sources that either back up or disprove the content in the commercial.  This – in my opinion – will be the most important and most helpful feature of the new app.

Obviously, these new apps won’t stop the contributions from flowing into the PACs, and they certainly won’t stop the attack ads from going on the air.  They could, however, provide average voters with information they may not have obtained otherwise, and an informed general public is never a bad thing.  So far this election year, over $300 million have been contributed to various Super PACs across the country. Thanks to the Citizens United decision, these multimillion dollar contributions remain anonymous, prompting the media to coin the phrase “dark money.”  This isn’t to say Super PACs are “bad,” but the regulations at which they are permitted to operate have loopholes that have been found and exploited at the expense of the average voter.  Since the FEC has continued to show their unwillingness to update their disclosure regulations, technological innovation has stepped in to fill in the cracks.

These two apps, if they’re used by enough people, will accomplish their goals of increasing transparency between the government and the American people.

The donors may still be anonymous, the money still dark, and the ads still factually shaky.  But now, armed with our iPhones, at least we’ll know a little more about the groups who paid for them.

 

 

 

Super PACs overshadow armies of small donors

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According to FEC data, over 2.5 million people have made political contributions to the presidential campaign of their choice of $200 or less. That sounds like a large number. That is a large number.

It just doesn’t mean as much as it used to.

Four years ago, President Obama’s campaign made history with their innovative techniques of encouraging small-dollar donors’ involvement. 45 percent of his funds came from individuals who contributed $200 or less. In this election year so far, that percentage has drastically shrunk.

Through June, the 2.5 million people who have made small donations to either presidential campaign represent only 18 percent of the two parties’ total funds. According to Politico, during this election, the top .07 percent of donors is more valuable than the bottom 86 percent. In an election where virtually all we hear from either candidate is the necessity to strengthen our middle class, the fundraising statistics are awfully top-heavy.

Of course, like most things, there are varying opinions on the matter. Some voters think money is money. If both sides are using these Super PACs, there is still a level playing field. Campaign finance directors have no choice but to fall on this side of the argument. In the last election, Obama urged wealthy Democrats not to spend money on third party groups supporting his campaign. Four years later, that message has been forced to change.

But a large amount of voters disagree. They don’t think it’s fair that the fundraising for a general election is being virtually dominated by the super wealthy.

It’s very possible that President Obama won four years ago because he convinced the small-dollar donors – the Average Joe’s, the middle class, the “regular” people – that he would represent their best interest. He developed a relationship with the people, and they showed their appreciation by contributing financially. Yes, the checks were small – five, ten, fifty dollars – but giving money seemed to provide his supporters with an invaluable sense of involvement with the campaign. That connection between candidates and voters may suffer if Super PACs continue financially overshadowing armies of small donors.

The small donor revolution that President Obama’s campaign pioneered four years ago seems to be coming to a sudden halt. Was this inevitable? Will it impact the upcoming election?

Those questions could be answered in the next few months.